Tropical forest response to heat

Supervisors: Professor Emanuel Gloor, Dr David Galbraith, Beatriz Marimon-Schwantes and Benhur Marimon.

The southern fringes of Amazonia have warmed up particularly rapidly over the past decades reaching by now temperatures up to 42 degrees. Such high temperatures are expected to exert stress on forests in this region. Using these ongoing climate changes as a natural laboratory to study their effect on trees, we have installed a canopy overlooking tower and equipped it with optical, thermal and fluoresecence camera in Nova Xavantina, Mato Grosso, Brazil. In addition we are measuring high resolution stem growth (using high precision dendrometers), climate (precipitation, radiation, temperature), soil moisture and have measured a range of properties of different trees in the field of view of the cameras (like thresholds to hydraulic functioning of trees). Stem respiration could also be measured but is not currently being done.

The project will consist in analysing these data and what they tell us about various responses of different tree species, and may include visit and additional measurements to be done at the site. Analyses of the data may include modelling of tree functioning using an individual based forest simulator.

Entry requirements

Applicants should have, or be in their final year and expecting to receive, a minimum of a UK upper second class honours degree (2:1) in a relevant subject. Applicants will need to have their own funding in place for fees and living costs. Study can begin on the first of any month.

How to apply

Please see “Step 2” on our How to apply page.

UK/EU applicants may be eligible for a £1000 Masters by Research Bursary, funded by the Ecology and Global Change cluster. Up to 2 bursaries are available and will be awarded on academic merit. Applications received before the 30th June 2019 will be considered for the bursary.

For project enquiries, please contact Professor Emanuel Gloor or Dr David Galbraith. For application enquiries, please contact Jacqui Manton, e: j.manton@leeds.ac.uk.