Tom Haines-Doran

Tom Haines-Doran

Profile

I am a Research Fellow currently working on the Living Well within Limits project. My research focuses on the political economy of transport and infrastructure provision. I have recently completed my PhD at SOAS, University of London, on the relationship between central government and the provision of railway services in Britain since privatisation.

I am also a Research Fellow at the Institute for Transport Studies, researching for the Mobility Theme in the Centre for Reduction in Energy Demand Solutions. My research focusses on how governance structures and practices influences local and regional governments’ level of action to reduce carbon emissions from transport.

Research interests

My current research focuses on identifying the political and economic challenges posed when attempting to move towards more environmentally sustainable and socially just forms of transport provision. For example, one of my major areas of research is on the role of consumer car finance in creating and reinforcing the culture of "car dependency".

I also reasearch the politics and economics of governmental pratices in decarbonising transport.

I’ve also performed extensive research into the role of social movements in creating positive political and social changes. I’m particularly interested in the role of workers' movements and how academic research can support them.

<h4>Research projects</h4> <p>Any research projects I'm currently working on will be listed below. Our list of all <a href="https://environment.leeds.ac.uk/dir/research-projects">research projects</a> allows you to view and search the full list of projects in the faculty.</p>

Qualifications

  • PhD, Economics: SOAS, University of London
  • MA, Politics: International Political Economy, University of Manchester
  • BA Politics, Manchester Metropolitan University

Professional memberships

  • International Initiative for the Promotion of Political Economy

Research groups and institutes

  • Social and Political Sciences