Hanna Pettersson

Hanna Pettersson

Profile

I am a first year PhD candidate and a part of the Leeds-York NERC Doctoral Training Partnership.

I am a social scientist by training but have an interdisciplinary research focus. My background is in social and environmental studies, from which I gained theoretical perspectives that I am now applying within human dimensions of biodiversity conservation. I have been working with and researching conservation related topics for the past five years through both practical and theoretical approaches. This has spanned several countries, organisations and projects such as monitoring of jaguar populations in Costa Rica, rewilding of large mammals in Argentina, studying how biodiversity conservation are impacting the Sustainable Development Goals through Cambridge Conservation Initiative  and environmental education and management at Nordens Ark in Sweden.

My research project is centered around human-carnivore relations in European landscapes. I will be looking at the dynamics between returning large carnivore populations (mainly wolf and bear), managing authorities and local communities.  My focus will be on cases of co-existence and mutual adaptation, what enables this and how it can be reinforced. I will draw on perspectives and theories from both natural and social sciences and use quantitative and qualitative methods to conduct my analysis.

Research interests

  • Rewilding and landscape restoration
  • Species restoration and re-introduction
  • Human-carnivore conflict and coexistence
  • Mutual human-wildlife adaptation 
  • Human behaviours, values and attitudes
  • Power dynamics and discoursive practices among different stakeholder groups
  • Legitimacy, trust and governance within natural resource management

Qualifications

  • MSc Biodiversity, Conservation and Management, University of Oxford
  • BSc Environmental Science (major in Human Ecology), University of Gothenburg
  • BSc Global Studies, University of Gothenburg

Research groups and institutes

  • Sustainability Research Institute
  • Environment and Development